Miami office: (305) 892 0008
 
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Welcome Patients

Elena Katz, D.M.D., MsCD  Nova SE University School of Dentistry. Prosthodontics  F.A.C.D.  Residency at Beth Israel Hospital, Newark, NJ, Fellow-World Clinical Laser Institute. Over 30 years expirience. America's Top Dentists 2008-2016.

Diplomate the International Congress of Oral Implantologists.
   


At the dental practice of Dr. Elena Katz, we believe communication is the key to successful treatment. Starting with your initial visit, Dr. Katz will take the time to talk with you about your previous dental experiences and about your expectations for your future dental care. Throughout your treatments, Doctor and her staff will work with you to ensure that you understand your options and that you are ultimately satisfied with the way that your mouth looks and feels.

Post Operative Care


After Oral Surgery: Post-Operative Care

On day 1:

BLEEDING: Following tooth removal some bleeding is to be expected. Keep biting pressure on gauze for approximately 1-2 hours. Repeat if necessary, replacing gauze every 30-45 minutes. If heavy bleeding persists, call our dentist office.

DO NOT under any circumstances smoke, rinse your mouth vigorously, or drink forcefully through a straw for 48 hours. These activities will disturb the forming blood clot and can lead to a painful condition called dry socket.

DO NOT RINSE MOUTH TODAY: You may drink liquids as usual, but do not rinse and spit as this may dislodge blood clot in the healing site.

On day 2:

Following extraction, you may gently rinse your mouth with warm salt water (1/2 tsp. salt in 1 glass of warm water). Rinse your mouth ever 3 to 4 hours (especially after meals). Continue rinses for several days.

You may brush and floss your teeth as normal, being careful not to brush into extraction site. Proper oral hygiene will speed the healing process and diminish sensitivity. For the first few days following oral surgery, use light, gentle pressure when brushing and flossing around the surgical site.

On day 3:

Following extraction, you may pick out any food from extraction site, gently, with a toothpick. Continue to do this until the area is completely healed, usually about 3-4 weeks.

SWELLING: After an extraction, you may feel some discomfort or swelling. A plastic bag of ice wrapped in a towel should be applied to the operated area-30 minutes on and 30 minutes off-for 4 to 5 hours.

MEDICATION: For mild to average pain, use any non-aspirin type of pain medication you like. If your surgery was extensive, a prescribed medication for pain and or antibiotic for infection should be taken as directed.

FOOD: Drink plenty of fluids and maintain a soft, light diet for the first couple days following your surgery. Do not suck on extraction site and avoid strenuous activities for 24 hours following your surgery.

BONY EDGES: Small, sharp bone fragments may work up through the gums during healing. These are not roots; if they are annoying please return to the office for their simple removal.

Remember that your mouth is in a healing phase and will need time to return to normal. If you fe any problems or have any concerns, please contact our dentist office.

After Root Canal Therapy

Root canal therapy can take 1, 2 or 3 appointments depending on each case. It is possible to experience any of the following symptoms after any one of these appointments: sensitivity to hot and/or cold; sensitivity to pressure; possible swelling.

It is difficult to predict which symptoms, if any, you may experience and to what extent. In complicated cases, pain medication may be necessary. If an antibiotic has been prescribed, be sure to take it as directed.

If you experience any swelling, call our dentist office; it may be necessary to prescribe an antibiotic for you.

A temp filling may be used to seal the tooth between visits. This material may chip away before you return; if this is uncomfortable for you or it falls out completely please call our dentist office and we will replace it. Be gentle on the tooth while eating until the final restoration is placed.

During root canal therapy the nerve, blood and nutrient supply to the tooth and some hard tooth is removed. This causes the tooth to become brittle and prone to fracture. In most cases a crown is needed to prevent this from happening.

After Crown or Bridge Preparation

Following the first appointment for a crown or bridge procedure, a provisional temporary is usually placed on the tooth or teeth involved. This will protect them while the custom crown or bridge is being made.

Provisional temporary crowns are of a universal shade that also serve a cosmetic function for front teeth. Your final restoration will be shaped and shaded better than the temporary to match your other teeth in both color and function. The temporary will not be as smooth as the permanent glazed porcelain crown.

A temporary tooth-colored restoration has been placed to protect the tooth (teeth) while your new restoration is being made. Avoid heavy chewing and sticky foods while wearing your temporary. If it does come off before your next appointment, simply pop it back in and call our office immediately.

Brush around the crown or bridge extra well until the final restoration is inserted. Be careful flossing, pull the floss out to the side, not up through the contact, to avoid popping off the temporary.

Many crowns fit below the gum- line. Therefore, you may feel some discomfort for a few days due to the irritation of that area during the procedures. Sensitivity to cold or pressure is also possible.

After the anesthetic subsides, it may take a few days to get used to the provisional temporary crown or bridge. If you feel the bite is not correctly balanced, be sure to call our dentist office immediately for a simple adjustment.

We recommend professional maintenance and evaluation at least two times a year. If you have had a periodontal (gum disease) problem in the past we recommend 3 to 4 times a year.

After "Tooth Colored" Non-Mercury Bonded Fillings/Restorations

This material is already hardened with the use of the high intensity light. You may begin to chew and eat once the local anesthetic has worn off completely.

A healthy diet with a low sugar intake will help prevent the decay and breakdown of your restoration. Additionally, try to reduce or eliminate soda pop (sugar or sugar-free) and other foods (like citrus) that have a high acid content. To help reduce staining you may want to limit foods and drinks that cause staining such as coffee, tea, red wine and tobacco.

You may experience some minor discomfort the first few days after your treatment. This should diminish gradually over time. It is normal for the tooth or teeth to be tender when the anesthetic subsides. To help alleviate this, take a dose of pain medication. Tylenol, aspirin, or ibuprofen will all work. If the tooth is still sensitive, additional doses may be necessary.

If you have been given and anesthetic, this should wear off in a few hours. Please be careful not to bite your cheek or tongue. Also, do not eat or drink anything extremely hot or cold until the anesthetic has completely worn off.

The bite should feel normal when the anesthetic wears off. If sensitivity to hot, cold or biting pressure persist longer than one week, please call our dentist office for a follow-up evaluation and/or simple adjustment.

The tooth will look natural in color, so you may not be able to notice the restoration.

The surface texture and consistency may feel a little different at first but, will smoothen with use.

Do not bite anything with your teeth that can damage them (such as finger nails, thread, fishing line, paper clips, pens, ice cubes, popcorn kernels etc.). Clenching and grinding will also destroy resin restorations quickly due to the excessive pressure they subject the restoration to.

We recommend professional maintenance and evaluation at least twice a year. If you have had a periodontal (gum disease)problem in the past, you should see us a minimum of four times a year.

Proper care includes brushing, flossing and rinsing with a mouthwash a minimum of twice daily.

After Crown/Bridge/Inlay/Onlay Cementation

The cement is already set and the crown, veneer, inlay/onlay or bridge is ready for immediate use.

You may experience some minor discomfort for the first few days after your treatment. This should diminish gradually over time.

If you have been given an anesthetic, this should subside in a few hours. Please be careful not to bite your cheek or tongue. Also, do not eat or drink anything extremely hot or cold until the anesthetic has completely worn off.

The bite should feel normal when the anesthetic subsides. The bite has been adjusted so your new crown feels natural. If it feels that your bite is still high, contact our office for an adjustment. If sensitivity to hot, cold or biting pressure persist longer than one week, please call our office for a follow-up evaluation and/or simple adjustment.

The tooth will look natural in color, so you may not be able to notice the restoration.

Do not bite anything with your teeth that can damage them (such as finger nails, thread, fishing line, paper clips, pens, etc.).

We recommend professional maintenance and evaluation at least twice a year. If you have had a periodontal (gum disease) problem in the past, you should see us a minimum of four times a year.

Proper care includes brushing, flossing and rinsing with a mouthwash a minimum of twice daily. 

After Oral Surgery: Post-Operative Care 

On day 1:

BLEEDING: Following tooth removal some bleeding is to be expected. Keep biting pressure on gauze for approximately 1-2 hours. Repeat if necessary, replacing gauze every 30-45 minutes. If heavy bleeding persists, call our dentist office.

DO NOT under any circumstances smoke, rinse your mouth vigorously, or drink forcefully through a straw for 48 hours. These activities will disturb the forming blood clot and can lead to a painful condition called dry socket.

DO NOT RINSE MOUTH TODAY: You may drink liquids as usual, but do not rinse and spit as this may dislodge blood clot in the healing site.

On day 2:

Following extraction, you may gently rinse your mouth with warm salt water (1/2 tsp. salt in 1 glass of warm water). Rinse your mouth ever 3 to 4 hours (especially after meals). Continue rinses for several days.

You may brush and floss your teeth as normal, being careful not to brush into extraction site. Proper oral hygiene will speed the healing process and diminish sensitivity. For the first few days following oral surgery, use light, gentle pressure when brushing and flossing around the surgical site.

On day 3:

Following extraction, you may pick out any food from extraction site, gently, with a toothpick. Continue to do this until the area is completely healed, usually about 3-4 weeks.

SWELLING: After an extraction, you may feel some discomfort or swelling. A plastic bag of ice wrapped in a towel should be applied to the operated area-30 minutes on and 30 minutes off-for 4 to 5 hours.

MEDICATION: For mild to average pain, use any non-aspirin type of pain medication you like. If your surgery was extensive, a prescribed medication for pain and or antibiotic for infection should be taken as directed.

FOOD: Drink plenty of fluids and maintain a soft, light diet for the first couple days following your surgery. Do not suck on extraction site and avoid strenuous activities for 24 hours following your surgery.

BONY EDGES: Small, sharp bone fragments may work up through the gums during healing. These are not roots; if they are annoying please return to the office for their simple removal.

Remember that your mouth is in a healing phase and will need time to return to normal. If you fe any problems or have any concerns, please contact our dentist office.

After Root Canal Therapy 

Root canal therapy can take 1, 2 or 3 appointments depending on each case. It is possible to experience any of the following symptoms after any one of these appointments: sensitivity to hot and/or cold; sensitivity to pressure; possible swelling.

It is difficult to predict which symptoms, if any, you may experience and to what extent. In complicated cases, pain medication may be necessary. If an antibiotic has been prescribed, be sure to take it as directed.

If you experience any swelling, call our dentist office; it may be necessary to prescribe an antibiotic for you.

A temp filling may be used to seal the tooth between visits. This material may chip away before you return; if this is uncomfortable for you or it falls out completely please call our dentist office and we will replace it. Be gentle on the tooth while eating until the final restoration is placed.

During root canal therapy the nerve, blood and nutrient supply to the tooth and some hard tooth is removed. This causes the tooth to become brittle and prone to fracture. In most cases a crown is needed to prevent this from happening.

 

After Crown or Bridge Preparation 

Following the first appointment for a crown or bridge procedure, a provisional temporary is usually placed on the tooth or teeth involved. This will protect them while the custom crown or bridge is being made.

Provisional temporary crowns are of a universal shade that also serve a cosmetic function for front teeth. Your final restoration will be shaped and shaded better than the temporary to match your other teeth in both color and function. The temporary will not be as smooth as the permanent glazed porcelain crown.

A temporary tooth-colored restoration has been placed to protect the tooth (teeth) while your new restoration is being made. Avoid heavy chewing and sticky foods while wearing your temporary. If it does come off before your next appointment, simply pop it back in and call our office immediately.

Brush around the crown or bridge extra well until the final restoration is inserted. Be careful flossing, pull the floss out to the side, not up through the contact, to avoid popping off the temporary.

Many crowns fit below the gum- line. Therefore, you may feel some discomfort for a few days due to the irritation of that area during the procedures. Sensitivity to cold or pressure is also possible.

After the anesthetic subsides, it may take a few days to get used to the provisional temporary crown or bridge. If you feel the bite is not correctly balanced, be sure to call our dentist office immediately for a simple adjustment.

We recommend professional maintenance and evaluation at least two times a year. If you have had a periodontal (gum disease) problem in the past we recommend 3 to 4 times a year.

 

After "Tooth Colored" Non-Mercury Bonded Fillings/Restorations 

This material is already hardened with the use of the high intensity light. You may begin to chew and eat once the local anesthetic has worn off completely.

A healthy diet with a low sugar intake will help prevent the decay and breakdown of your restoration. Additionally, try to reduce or eliminate soda pop (sugar or sugar-free) and other foods (like citrus) that have a high acid content. To help reduce staining you may want to limit foods and drinks that cause staining such as coffee, tea, red wine and tobacco.

You may experience some minor discomfort the first few days after your treatment. This should diminish gradually over time. It is normal for the tooth or teeth to be tender when the anesthetic subsides. To help alleviate this, take a dose of pain medication. Tylenol, aspirin, or ibuprofen will all work. If the tooth is still sensitive, additional doses may be necessary.

If you have been given and anesthetic, this should wear off in a few hours. Please be careful not to bite your cheek or tongue. Also, do not eat or drink anything extremely hot or cold until the anesthetic has completely worn off.

The bite should feel normal when the anesthetic wears off. If sensitivity to hot, cold or biting pressure persist longer than one week, please call our dentist office for a follow-up evaluation and/or simple adjustment.

The tooth will look natural in color, so you may not be able to notice the restoration.

The surface texture and consistency may feel a little different at first but, will smoothen with use.

Do not bite anything with your teeth that can damage them (such as finger nails, thread, fishing line, paper clips, pens, ice cubes, popcorn kernels etc.). Clenching and grinding will also destroy resin restorations quickly due to the excessive pressure they subject the restoration to.

We recommend professional maintenance and evaluation at least twice a year. If you have had a periodontal (gum disease)problem in the past, you should see us a minimum of four times a year.

Proper care includes brushing, flossing and rinsing with a mouthwash a minimum of twice daily.

After Crown/Bridge/Inlay/Onlay Cementation

The cement is already set and the crown, veneer, inlay/onlay or bridge is ready for immediate use.

You may experience some minor discomfort for the first few days after your treatment. This should diminish gradually over time.

If you have been given an anesthetic, this should subside in a few hours. Please be careful not to bite your cheek or tongue. Also, do not eat or drink anything extremely hot or cold until the anesthetic has completely worn off.

The bite should feel normal when the anesthetic subsides. The bite has been adjusted so your new crown feels natural. If it feels that your bite is still high, contact our office for an adjustment. If sensitivity to hot, cold or biting pressure persist longer than one week, please call our office for a follow-up evaluation and/or simple adjustment.

The tooth will look natural in color, so you may not be able to notice the restoration.

Do not bite anything with your teeth that can damage them (such as finger nails, thread, fishing line, paper clips, pens, etc.).

We recommend professional maintenance and evaluation at least twice a year. If you have had a periodontal (gum disease) problem in the past, you should see us a minimum of four times a year.

Proper care includes brushing, flossing and rinsing with a mouthwash a minimum of twice daily.

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